Tag Archives: Shoegaze

Slowdive Live – Village Underground 19/05/2014

21 May

“Slowdive are reforming and they are playing in London.”  Was I hearing right?

“Yeah, now what are you calling for?” My incredulity at hearing the above and the fact that the person that called me is partial to a bit of leg pulling made what was being said fall on suspicious ears.

Right, straight onto Google to find the inevitable truth that this was going to be a lie. Well, f**k me, it is true. I still didn’t feel like this was happening. OK I know I sound  like a kid at Christmas but when a band reforms that you spent years telling people that you would have done anything to have seen them live, when that becomes a reality, it just takes a while for it to feel real.

It was a few days before the tickets went on sale and I knew they would go fast. I needed to be on the computer at 9am on the day of sale.

So, here goes. Would I be in for a massive let down, after two minutes the answer was a huge resounding YES. “Sold out” the website proclaimed. I wasn’t surprised but I was angry. I spent the next 10 minutes watching Twitter posts appear from joyous fans that had bagged tickets. You lucky gits, I thought.

In sheer despondent hope I went back onto the site and clicked to buy and bang, “Choose quantity” came up. I clicked two and the purchase was made. I was actually going to see Slowdive live, it hadn’t really hit me  but once the E-Tickets came through, I felt more at ease.

The Village Underground in Shoreditch was a venue I had not attended before and have to say it is one I would like to see more bands at. It’s high-roofed and has a post-industrial feel to it and the acoustics are great. Bring on the music.

The air of expectancy was pungent and excitement filled conversations filled the air. Labradford and Brian Eno were the intro tracks and added to the atmosphere wonderfully.

A roar went up and Slowdive took to the stage with smiles all around the venue, including the stage.

The first track of the night ‘Slowdive’ flew into life and so did the crowd. The sound from the stage was incredible. Any notion of anyone staring at their shoes and doing very little went straight out of the window. Halfway through the song I already knew that this was going to be a special night.

‘Catch the Breeze’ sounded spectacularly dreamy and had the crowd swaying intently. A reworked version of ‘Crazy for You’ was one of the highlights for me and also highlighted that the fact the band were adding different dimensions to the songs rather than just ploughing knowingly through old ground.

It was obvious by now to anyone at the gig that Slowdive were full of intent and better than ever.

’40 Days’ had at least one audience member in tears of joy. Not since Mogwai on the Come on Die Young tour have I seen such emotion at a concert. The euphoria was evident on every face that I saw.

The whole set lasted just under 2 hours and after two stunning encores of ‘Rutti’ and ‘Alison’ the band left the stage. Somebody next to me proclaimed that “That was a bit f**cking special” and as blunt and to the point as this statement was, the look on the faces on people leaving the venue confirmed this exclamation.

I listened to Slowdive on my way home and felt sated yet deflated because it was all over but at the same time, I would have been ten times worse had I missed this gig.

The band plays a number of dates around the world in 2014 and if you are contemplating seeing them, I would say that the live experience is one to behold and one that I will cherish for the rest of my life. By the end it felt very real indeed and trust me when I say, SLOWDIVE ARE BACK!

SET LIST.

Slowdive 
Avalyn 
Catch the Breeze 
Crazy for You 
Machine Gun 
40 Days 
Blue Skied an’ Clear 
Souvlaki Space Station 
When the Sun Hits 
Morningrise 
She Calls 
Golden Hair (Syd Barrett cover) 
Encore: 
Rutti 
Alison

 

 

 

 

 

Distant Correspondent. Music for hangovers.

14 May

I’m sure a fair few of you will know the feeling… The early morning alarm wakes you up after the night before, your brain and tongue feel like a deflated football and there’s a fully fit team putting the proverbial boot in.

Hit the snooze button, even though you know another ten minutes in bed isn’t going to make any difference and only adds to the contemplation of the disastrous day ahead.

Jumping up, as you are now running late, the shower might put a positive dent in this feeling. Think again! 8 + pints of ‘something’ that you can still taste and feel isn’t going to be shifted by a stream of tepid water and cheap shower gel.

By the time you have arrived at your place of work, you wonder how the hell you even managed to crawl in and out of bed. A glance at the clock makes that the fact that you have another 7 hours of the working day left totally unbearable.

Right, it’s time for action, coffee and music. This is where Distant Correspondent came in.

On this particular day music was the only thing that could save me and this is where I searched for a cure for the previous night’s antics.

Meanwhile Back in Communist Russia were one of my favourite bands from the early 2000’s and were my band for lazy days of contemplation, (and were what I was listening to on this particularly painful day) after a night of heavy indulgence, MBICR mixed guitar, electronics and female spoken word and created something that was part Arab Strap part Life Without Buildings before both bands existed.

After searching online for what the guys and girl from MBICR were up to at present, the name Distant Correspondent kept popping up. I read a few bits about the band and knew from the write ups that this would be a project that I would like and needed on this day.

I nipped over to Spotify to see what was available by DC and was pleased to see that the band had release a self –titled album in 2013.

dc111111

The band consists of  David Obuchowski (Goes Cube), Michael Lengel, Edith Frost and  Emily Gray (Meanwhile Back in Communist Russia). The music is written via the internet as the musicians live on differing continents – You now know where the name comes from.

Anyway, where were we? OK I was about to hit play. ‘Listen’ the first track on the album took me where I needed to be. My hangover took a back seat and was no longer the focus of my previously jaded attention. Guitars drenched in reverb and delay, ice cool ethereal vocals and dreamy textures were the perfect start.

dist

Track three on the album ‘Cyclone’ blew me and my cobwebbed head away completely. Reminiscent of The Cocteau Twins and a slowed down version of DIf Juz, I could imagine Distant Correspondent being a perfect band for the 4AD label.

This self-titled release is music to get joyously lost in. It’s not the most diverse release I have ever heard but the album works wonderfully as a whole. Reverb and delay are the primary features but DC succinctly splash small nuances throughout the songs and the less is more approach fits perfectly here.

Emily Gray’s spoken word pieces float in and out of the songs and this is another area that DC has utilized to perfection. I had always adored her voice, it’s the sort of voice that whispered into your ear, sends shivers down your spine and makes headphones a must for this album.

Some of the songs do pick up the tempo; ’Summit’ is a prime example of this, Gray is on top form and so are the band. This is the musical equivalent of reading a secret diary and feeling waves of empathy for the author’s troubles. ‘Summit’ is a stunning track and one that I have had on repeat along with the whole album for days now

By the end of the first full play of the album, all my thoughts and feelings connect to my inebriation and its after effects were a thing of the past and the only way I could keep them at bay was to hit play and listen to this album again and again.

Trust me, the album sounds even better without the added hangover but in case of emergency it’s the CD cabinet and not the medicine cabinet I will be reaching for after one of those nights in the future, DC are the musical equivalent of pain killers and re-hydration – Very comforting and refreshing.

Here we have an interview with David and Michael from the band.

So, how are you?

David: Pretty good, pretty good.
Michael: Great!

What are the band up to currently?

David: Well, we’re doing a lot of recording right now. My wife and I recently had a baby girl, and so that put our live stuff on hold for a bit. But all this time at home has allowed me to put all my focus back into writing.

Michael: Yes, recording, recording, recording. We’re in the early stages on several new songs I think we’re all pretty excited about. After our fall tour and a bunch of Denver shows, there’s definitely a reflection of the live dynamics we’re drawing from in these new songs.

dcpic

Have you played or do you plan to play any gigs?

David: Ah well, we actually went on a national tour this past fall in support of our album. Emily even came over from the UK to be a part of it. It was a lot of fun playing nearly every night, drinking beer in a different town every night, and all of us Americans speaking to Emily in our best English accents. We played a slew of shows when we got home from that tour. But as I said, my wife and I just had a baby so we’re spending our time recording and writing right now. Though, I expect we’ll be back at it come summer.

Michael: It’s funny, when you’re in one stage of the process how you can yearn for the other… when you’re touring you start to get fidgety, wanting to write and record; when you’re recording, you can’t wait to play the songs live. We’ll have shows coming in the summer, but for now, speaking for myself at least, just trying to be present and enjoy developing these new songs.

How would you describe your sound?

David: We have a running joke in the band that we’re “trans-Atlantic dreamwave.” For some reason every piece of press that came out when we were on tour used that phrase. We couldn’t escape it. I guess I’d actually describe our sound as being a kind of dreamy, lush post-punk. We try to put tension and dynamics and hooks into all the songs (which is where the post-punk comes from), but then really try to fill it out as much as possible with layers and melody.

Michael: Yeah, “trans-Atlantic dreamwave” has kinda stuck…

dcvocals

What are your musical influences?

David: I mean, as the guy who plays and writes the guitar parts, I think I’m probably wearing a lot of my influences on my sleeve: Cocteau Twins, Smiths, Slowdive, One Last Wish, Kate Bush. But then, I’ve also been playing metal for a very long time, so that still factors into it. So there’s some Russian Circles, Pelican, Isis influences happening for me, too. I’ll let everyone else tell you what their influences are.

Michael: Rhythmically, I draw from Boards of Canada who for me, bring an impressive simplicity but intense groove to their beats. Liars, Fly Pan Am and some older stuff like Scott Walker’s huge sounds from Scott 1, 2, 3 and 4, Harumi which is Japanese psych from the 60s… These don’t really show in our sound per se, but what I love about each of these is that balance of relative simplicity with invention that adds a dimension of intrigue rhythmically.

What was the last album you listened to?

David: As I type this, the last album I listened to was Suzanne Vega’s first LP.

Michael: Echo Lake’s LP, Wild Peace. Absolutely delicious.

I noticed a love of delay and reverb on the album, where did this influence come from?

David: I think the obvious answer, again, is to look at the Cocteaus and Slowdive and Smiths. But from a practical perspective, the answer is probably just as much about the metal bands I’ve toured with (in my band Goes Cube). Goes Cube has always had a big Quicksand, Helmet post-hardcore influence mixed with more straight-up thrashy/grindy/driving stuff like Napalm Death. But between listening to Hydra Head bands (like Isis) and touring with bands like Dub Trio and East of the Wall, I was amazed at the textures that could be created with delay even in the heaviest, most brutal music. So with both Goes Cube and Distant Correspondent, I’ve been a little more interested in that. But with Distant Correspondent, I’m also adding chorus to the delay, which gives it that sort of shameless shoegazey/new wave British sound, which I love. There was a moment early in the record process where I played a chord and it sounded kind of like the guitars in “Headmaster’s Ritual,” and I decided “that’s it!”

If you had to chose one of your own songs for our listeners to hear, which would it be?

David: “Shatter” seems to be a big favorite. And I do love that song. I also love “Summit.” But then, I’ve always felt like “Forward” could be a real kind of “single.” I don’t recommend it as the ONE song everyone should hear, but I think “Department” is one of my favorite songs on the record, though I think it’s probably most people’s least favorite. I didn’t really give you a straight answer, did I? Oh well, I can’t decide.

Michael: “Say” and “Clay” I think are two songs that show a bit of our ability to create a dreamy soundscape that also has a driving element.

Anything else you would like to add.

David: Yes, we had a UK-only single come out on Static Caravan Recordings. It got really good press. We have an amazing British member (Emily Gray, who used to be the vocalist for Meanwhile Back In Communist Russia, a band I’ve been obsessed with for well over a decade now). Point is: We really want to come tour the UK. Aren’t there any booking agents and/or promoters who want to help us out? We practically ARE a UK band. I mean, you should hear our accents!

Michael: I think Emily would confirm our accents are immaculate.

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